Yolo Crisis Nursery Crab Feed

When crab season comes each year to Northern California so does the Annual Yolo Crisis Nursery Crab Feed. Join us for all the fun, food, and yes, fundraising!

The 2021 Yolo Crisis Nursery Crab Feed will be a virtual SHELLebration like no other! We’ll still enjoy delicious crab and have some fun fundraising for vulnerable children in Yolo County!

The Friends of the Yolo Crisis Nursery have worked hard to plan a unique, one-of-a-kind experience for you. Drive through for a masked, contactless pick-up of a CLAWesome crab dinner then enjoy your dinner, your favorite beverage, and the virtual event from the comfort of your home.

Silent Auction and Live Auction preview will be available on Monday, March 8th. We’ll email a link so keep your eye on your inbox!

Tickets and sponsorships are still available via the online ticketing link above. If you have any questions, please contact bheard@yolocrisisnursery.org

It has been over 10 months since the first COVID-19 case was diagnosed in Yolo County. In that time, much has been asked of all of us, from flexibility, bravery and resilience to fortitude, patience and austerity. At Yolo Crisis Nursery, we have also seen firsthand the even greater impact this time of uncertainty, grief and upheaval has had on our community’s most vulnerable young children and families.

Yet, today, even as we are called on to address worrying increases in domestic violence, homelessness, and mental health emergencies, it is not difficult to conjure a deep sense of gratitude, which comes from knowing that we at the Nursery are not meeting these challenges alone.

Recently, a former Yolo Crisis Nursery parent took the time to share this note: “We need caring and compassionate people more than anything, especially now. You are front line workers not just in this pandemic, but always, for every crisis. As a family who benefited directly from your compassionate work, and also just as fellow caring humans, we are forever grateful for and inspired by the strength, dedication, kindness, proficiency and understanding with which you provide crucial services to our community.”

I couldn’t agree more. Today, I am grateful for our staff at the nursery who have never wavered in their commitment to our mission. The work of protecting children from abuse and neglect requires building and maintaining supportive, trusting and empowering relationships with families. Every day our staff continues tirelessly to innovate and adapt to changing safety protocols, never losing sight of the importance of staying connected with the people we serve.

I am grateful for our Board of Directors and volunteers who have rallied in so many ways to guide and support the nursery through this unprecedented time. Their steadfast contributions of time, talent, and resources make it possible for us to respond nimbly to the evolving needs of vulnerable children and families.

I am grateful for our fellow nonprofits and service providers working diligently to collaborate in the best interest of children and families during a time of greatly increased need and decreased resources.

Many of the families we serve are essential workers facing health and safety hazards they never anticipated, while coping with serious hardships and childcare challenges as they struggle to make ends meet each month. I am grateful the Nursery can be a resource for families who contribute so much to our community.

Whether it is the gift of a warm coat, a care package of formula and diapers, or a safe stay for a child while a parent addresses hardship — we see and hear the gratitude and relief when a family in crisis understands that they are not alone.

In addition to gratitude, I look ahead to 2021 with a sense of hope. Just today, I learned that a single father, Frank, who came to us months ago on the brink of homelessness, has secured a job promotion and stable housing where he can safely raise his young son with autism. With the support of the Nursery and our collaborators, Frank can now see the light at the end of the tunnel. Stories like Frank’s and so many others help me see that light too.

As this challenging year comes to a close, and we look to 2021 with hope for health, happiness, and a return to some version of normal, I invite you to join us with an end of year gift to the Yolo Crisis Nursery to ensure that families, like Frank’s, see and feel the hope of the new year. To donate or learn more about the Yolo Crisis Nursery, please visit our website www.yolocrisisnursery.org.

— This article written by Heather Sleuter, executive director of the Yolo Crisis Nursery, originally appeared in the Davis Enterprise on December 27, 2020

November begins the holiday season — normally, a treasured time with family and friends. This year will undoubtedly look very different for us all. Even in years without the added stress of a pandemic, for many, the holidays are not always idyllic.

Increased loneliness, anxiety, sadness, and depression are common over the holidays. This year, it’s fair to say that most of us are looking for ways to overcome some degree of melancholy. Psychology research shows that giving and gratitude can help to lift spirits and are closely linked to increased happiness.

Giving Tuesday is an annual global day of generosity, perhaps, this year, ideally timed to help us feel empowered and impactful during a moment of uncertainty, fear, and loss.

Supporting the Yolo Crisis Nursery this Giving Tuesday, Dec. 1, will give hope to the most vulnerable children in Yolo County. Every family we serve is unique, with specific needs, but each is facing crisis and adversity and often has nowhere else to turn. Your donation can provide an overnight safe stay for a child, childcare essentials and caring support at the moment a family needs it the most. And this year, three amazing donors will double the impact of your gift, by matching dollar-for-dollar all donations up to $20,000!

Your gift to the Nursery will help families like Amanda’s break the cycle of crisis and become stronger together. Amanda, a mother of two, recently moved back to Yolo County after living out of state. Unable to find housing, she and her children moved into her mother’s home where they were exposed to domestic violence. Amanda shared that her mom had a long history of choosing “bad men” and that she herself had been exposed to domestic violence through much of her childhood.

When she met with a Yolo Crisis Nursery caseworker, Amanda was homeless, without a stable income, overwhelmed with her parental responsibilities, and trying to come to terms with the haunting domestic violence experiences of her own childhood. Amanda did not want her children to have the same exposure to violence that she experienced growing up. She reached out in hopes that the Nursery could provide the stability needed for her children to escape the violence in her mother’s home. Amanda was right, the Nursery not only provided respite care for the children, but also the opportunity for her to begin to heal and start anew.

Amanda is remarkably resilient, and she needed to rely on that strength as she began the hard work of starting over again. She engaged with the Nursery’s wrap-around services to participate in parenting classes, address legal issues, find housing, obtain professional training, and engage in counseling.

In less than a year, Amanda has made remarkable accomplishments. She is in stable permanent housing with her two children. Her oldest child is enrolled in school and distance learning at a before- and aftercare program, and her youngest child is now in care at the Yolo Crisis Nursery while Amanda works towards completing nursing school and achieving her goal of becoming a nurse.

Amanda’s commitment, in the face of adversity, to keep her children safe, healthy, and strong is remarkable. Her hard work and resilience will continue to help Amanda achieve her goal of breaking the cycle of violence in her family. All of us at the Nursery are so excited to witness this strong mother attain her goals and build a brighter future for her children.

Having been with the Yolo Crisis Nursery for almost 20 years now, I continue to be amazed at the gratitude of our client families and the generosity of our supporters. Day in and day out, our staff and client families are addressing unimaginable challenges. All too often, the Nursery’s wrap-around approach and services can mean the difference between life and death for the youngest and most vulnerable children in our community

I invite you to start your season of gratitude by giving to a family facing extraordinary challenges. Through your support, the Nursery can avert disaster with well-timed assistance and early intervention. Please join us by making your gift on Giving Tuesday, Dec. 1, to enact positive change in our community and in the lives of vulnerable children in Yolo County. To learn more about the Yolo Crisis Nursery or to make a donation, please visit www.yolocrisisnursery.org.


This article was written by Becky Heard and originally appeared in the Davis Enterprise on Sunday, November 22, 2020.

Giving Tuesday is a global day of generosity that will take place on December 1, 2020. The stress of the pandemic is so pervasive in our lives. We invite you to join the giving movement that will bring comfort and joy to so many.
Give the most vulnerable children in Yolo County HOPE on December 1, 2020.

Together we can help break the cycle of poverty and abuse by providing overnight safe stays for children ages birth to 5 years and wrap around services for their families.  

Three generous anonymous donors have come together to double all donations dollar for dollar up to $20,000! We hope you will double the impact of your gift to the Nursery to help keep our most vulnerable children safe this winter. You can make your donation online or by texting GIVE to 530-298-0664.

The Yolo Crisis Nursery began serving children ages birth to five years old and their families in 2001. Since then, the Nursery has continuously provided early intervention services in a safe environment to nurture healthy and resilient children, strengthen parents and preserve families.

From 2001 until early 2014, the nursery operated under a parent nonprofit agency. Yolo Crisis Nursery executive director Heather Sleuter recalls receiving the news that the nursery would close in 30 days and our parent agency would leave Yolo County. “We had just bundled up the last of 12 children to leave for the day with parents and guardians. Two children would spend the night with our staff as their parents got immediate help. I thought, what will happen to these children — and all the children who need the nursery’s care — if we close?”

The departure of our host agency from Yolo County in 2014 created a crisis. The nursery was facing closure. A group of volunteers who had been formed years earlier for fundraising assistance to the Nursery — The Friends of the Yolo Crisis Nursery — immediately began to search for a licensed host agency to take over the Yolo Crisis Nursery operations. For a variety of reasons, one was not found.

With the 30 days’ notice of closure, the majority of grants that had funded the nursery were terminated. There was no more agency, no more money and no more time. The clock was ticking. And then, the angels arrived and brought with them the miracles that are now legendary.

Heidy Kellison, president of the Friends, boldly negotiated a continuation of the Yolo Crisis Nursery operations with private funding while a nonprofit corporation was formed, licensed and became a public 501(c)(3) charity. The Yolo Crisis Nursery now had 90 days to remain open while securing funding for the interim operation of the nursery and a full fiscal year of funding for operations totaling almost $400,000. Heidy returned to Friends of the Yolo Crisis Nursery with a three-month clock, determination and enduring hope.  She is my hero.

Yolo Crisis Nursery Inc., was formed with a board of directors consisting of Becky Heard, as chair, Kellison, Liz Malinoff, Trish Bosco and myself. On behalf of the new corporation, I submitted an application for 501 (c) (3) status, and Heather Sleuter, completed all of the licensing applications. Yolo County Children’s Alliance acted as the interim public charity on behalf of the new corporation.

With the 90 days quickly racing by, the newly formed board immediately hired Cam Stoufer to help replace the terminated grants with new funding streams. Cam’s efforts yielded immediate dividends and continued throughout her six years of service. While Cam applied for grant funding, the newly formed Board and the Friends of the Yolo Crisis Nursery were feverishly fundraising to save the nursery.

The Yolo Crisis Nursery is open today because of the generosity of Yolo County citizens, businesses and organizations, as well as our families and friends nationwide. All are connected by our shared belief that every child deserves to grow up in a safe, loving, and stable home. The redemption story of these times is for a different forum than this article, but the angles ranged from bakes sales to large monetary donations.

In those 90 days, contributions from family and friends, and the Yolo community of individuals, clubs, churches, and others, as well as grants, totaled $364,000! At the risk of forgetting someone, I will not attempt to enumerate the many contributors of time, talent and treasure. But, for the sake of deservedness, I must give credit to Yolo County Supervisor Jim Provenza for his advocacy during this perilous time.  His commitment and passion for the mission and community need of the Yolo Crisis Nursery became the cornerstone of our successful fundraising efforts.

In 2015, the newly licensed, nonprofit corporation Yolo Crisis Nursery Inc. began standalone activity. Sleuter was named executive director and has continued in that capacity to this day. In our first full year as an independent nonprofit, we served 129 children. Last year, we served 692 children. We serve at-risk children ages birth to 5 years old and their families as an upstream investment in the future of our community.

The COVID-19 pandemic has brought new challenges to the nursery. The Yolo Crisis Nursery is an essential service and has remained open during the stay-at-home orders. “Over six months into the pandemic, we have more families than ever in crisis. We are seeing increases in clients experiencing domestic violence, homelessness, and postpartum depression,” Sleuter said. “In addition, we are helping essential workers with young children and distributing record numbers of care packages in our community. The need has never been greater.”

As it has since 2001, the Nursery has remained open, serving a population under great stress. These families are hit hardest by the pandemic and are struggling with homelessness, unemployment, isolation, and uncertainty. I invite you to support the Nursery and the children they serve with your time, talents, or a donation. To learn more please visit www.yolocrisisnursery.org. We are community.

This article was written by Vic Bucher and originally appeared in the Davis Enterprise on Sunday, October 25, 2020.

Six months into the COVID-19 pandemic, we are all adapting to what our new “normal” life looks like. I am seeing this in my own life and in the experiences of my patients. For new parents, this is amplified in ways that many of us cannot fathom.

Just imagine bringing your first child into the world as a single mother. To keep your newborn baby safe, you are not able to share your bundle of joy with family and friends for fear of exposure to COVID. Beyond the emotional isolation, fulfilling basic needs, like going to the grocery store, is a challenge for fear of exposing both yourself and your infant to the virus.

Amber, a young mother of two, found herself isolated, alone and without any support. Amber and Josh welcomed their second child this summer and in August, Josh was deployed with the National Guard. This was not the first time Josh had been deployed, but it was the most challenging for Amber. The added stress of COVID-19 had her feeling isolated and more alone than ever. Separated from Josh, her family and friends, Amber was stripped of her usual support system and was unable to overcome the biological and emotional symptoms of postpartum depression.

Thankfully, Amber found the Yolo Crisis Nursery. Amber came to us exhausted, with despair visible on her face, not having slept in over a week. With her family thousands of miles away and friends unable to help due to the pandemic, Amber and her two children were all alone. The nursery welcomed Amber, her newborn daughter, and 4-year-old son with wraparound arms.

Our trauma-trained staff lovingly cared for the children while one of our caseworkers met with Amber to get her help and establish a treatment plan for her postpartum depression. Through our initial screening process, Amber’s 4-year-old son was identified as being on the autism spectrum. After his diagnosis, one of our caseworkers connected Amber to necessary services including Alta California Regional Center and an Individualized Education Plan. Meanwhile, the nursery cared for both children in our daycare and preschool while Amber received the necessary medical and counseling services to help her battle postpartum depression.

The Yolo Crisis Nursery is an essential resource for our community and a place of hope for families in crisis. I am proud to serve on the Yolo Crisis Nursery Board of Directors. As one of only four crisis nurseries in California, the Yolo Crisis Nursery is an essential early intervention child-abuse-prevention program. We serve families with children ages birth to 5 years and offer trauma-informed childcare, including crisis and respite care. Equally important are our wraparound services to assist families to resolve the crises that brought them to our door. Our services are voluntary and provided free of charge to our client families.

Unfortunately, history informs us that as stress increases — like during a pandemic — all too often, neglect and abuse also increase. Now more than ever, it is important that we recognize and guide those in our community, like Amber, who may need extra assistance to get the help they need.

Amber is not alone. Last year, 13% of new mothers reported experiencing postpartum depression in California. At the nursery and in my work as a physician, we have seen an increase in postpartum depression cases since COVID-19 caused the shelter-in-place order in March. This trend will likely continue because so many families are experiencing extreme stress, a risk factor for postpartum depression. Sadly, the populations most susceptible to postpartum depression are some of the hardest hit by the pandemic — racial and ethnic minorities, Medicaid-eligible low-income families, and those with lower levels of educational attainment. Those populations all report more cases of postpartum depression symptoms compared to non-Hispanic white women.

If you believe that all children deserve to grow up in a safe, loving, and stable home and would like to help young families like Amber’s, I invite you to join us at the Yolo Crisis Nursery. We are always looking for people who are willing to lend their time and talent to join us.  To learn more or to make a gift, please visit our website at www.yolocrisisnursery.org. We would love the opportunity to get to know you.

— By Joan Smith-Maclean, Yolo Crisis Nursery Board Member. This article originally appeared in the Davis Enterprise on Sunday, September 27, 2020

As a single mom and an essential worker, Amanda was in an impossible situation. She couldn’t survive financially without her job and childcare was scarce due to COVID-19. Amanda risked losing her job, her home, and most importantly, her four-year-old daughter, Isabella. The Yolo Crisis Nursery was there to meet Amanda’s emergency childcare needs and to help reduce her family’s stress. For the first time, we identified that Isabella is deaf and coping with significant developmental challenges. We connected Amanda with the necessary medical and social services. Meanwhile, Isabella thrived at the Nursery while Amanda worked and focused on resolving her family’s crisis. Isabella now attends a specialized preschool and Amanda is healthy, employed, and empowered to build a brighter future.

Regrettably, we will not be able to gather in person this fall at the annual Yolo Crisis Nursery Barn Dance. In the meantime, we are practicing our two-step and looking forward to an epic Barn Dance in Fall 2021!

We are pulling a magic trick out of our cowboy hats, thanks to the Travis Credit Union Foundation’s COVID 19 Relief Initiative!

We may not be able to boot scoot’n boogie this year, but we can kick up our heels to raise money for at-risk children by participating in the Travis Credit Union Foundation’s COVID-19 Relief Initiative.

Every dollar donated up to $20,000 by September 30th, will unlock a dollar-for-dollar matching gift from the Travis Credit Union Foundation for a possible total donation to the Nursery of $40,000!

Gifts in any amount are welcome. All of the money raised will go directly to helping young children and families in crisis.

To qualify for the matching gift, all donations must go through the Travis Credit Union Foundation. Travis Credit Union Foundation will keep all donor and donation information private. Rest assured the Nursery will receive your entire donation and the matching gift from Travis Credit Union Foundation. As much as we’d love to recognize and thank you personally, the Yolo Crisis Nursery will receive only the funds, but not the donor names or gift amounts.

Please visit the Foundation web site to donate online or for instructions on how to donate in person or by check. Please be sure to select from the drop-down box (we are 2nd from the bottom) or note Yolo Crisis Nursery on your check. Below is a screenshot of the donation page with the Yolo Crisis Nursery selection circled.

Join us each fall as we kick up our heels for kids at the Yolo Crisis Nursery Barn Dance! A one-of-a-kind event, hosted by the Friends of the Yolo Crisis Nursery. Line dance the night away to live music and tempt your taste buds with delicious Barn Dance fare available for purchase from local vendors. Beer, wine, and water will be available for purchase at our conveniently located watering holes.

The Barn Dance is all about community. It is about bringing people together for an evening of entertainment, dancing, and good old-fashioned fun to benefit the Yolo Crisis Nursery.