A Whole New World of Fun and Fundraising

To Yolo Crisis Nursery Crab Feed Co-Chairs Nancy Storm and Martha Bernauer, it was never a question of “if” we would hold our ninth annual event; it was always a matter of “how.”

All money raised at the Crab Feed goes directly to support our respite-care programs, and with the past year having been extraordinarily challenging for the children and families the Nursery serves, not having the Crab Feed was simply not an option to Nancy and Martha.

The Yolo Crisis Nursery Crab Feed was the first of its kind for us with a drive-through Crab Feed and virtual SHELLebration. We served over 600 crab dinners and hosted a multitude of people at our virtual event. Our community’s support and enthusiasm for the Nursery and Crab Feed exceeded our wildest dreams and was made possible by our generous sponsors, donors, volunteers and guests, to whom we say thank you, thank you, thank you!

We are deeply grateful to you, our community, for turning out in such force, demonstrating, once again, your unified support for the Nursery’s programs to prevent child abuse, nurture healthy and resilient children, strengthen parents, and preserve families. Thank you to everyone involved with the event for your commitment to the Nursery and to Yolo County’s most vulnerable children and their families.

It takes a village, and we cannot thank our volunteers enough, particularly Martha Bernauer, Sharon Schauer and Nancy Storm. The year-after-year growth of this sell-out event would not be possible without your leadership and tireless efforts. The Crab Feed is produced by the Friends of the Yolo Crisis Nursery Committee. We send heartfelt appreciation and a very special thanks to the entire Friends’ Committee for making the world a better place for the children of Yolo County.

On behalf of the board of directors, the nursery staff and the Friends of the Yolo Crisis Nursery, we would like to recognize and thank our Premier Sponsor Clark Pacific and King Crab Sponsors Jim and Lucinda Childress for their generosity and support.

Sincere thanks to our generous Dungeness Crab Sponsors Davis Firefighters Local #3494 and Davis Sunrise Rotary.

To our wonderful Blue Crab Sponsors: Assemblywoman Cecilia Aguiar-Curry; Bayer U.S. — Crop Science Vegetable Seeds; Brooks Painting; Boutin Jones Inc.; Carbahal & Company; Davisville Management Company; Mary and Harris Liu of Woodland McDonald’s; Marguerite Callahan; Nicole Davis of Edward Jones; Recology Davis; and the Vandermyden and Maddux Law Corporation — thank you.

Thank you to Collegiate Studios, Robin Dunbar, Lamppost Pizza, Nugget Markets, University Park Inn and Suites, and Upper Crust Bakery for your generous donations. And a very special thank you to our volunteers from the National Charity League and to our volunteer kitchen crew and traffic team. You were amazing. Charles King and Pacific Auction of Davis, we are extremely grateful for your expertise and assistance with our first-ever virtual SHELLebration.

Last but certainly not least, thank you to the numerous businesses, community groups, and individuals who donated items for our live and silent auctions. Your generosity was a critical piece to our success. Our community of small businesses always rallies to support those in need in our community, and we encourage you to shop local to support them.

If you are interested in helping the most vulnerable children and families in Yolo County, please consider joining the fun and fundraising for the Yolo Crisis Nursery by lending your time and talents to the Friends of the Yolo Crisis Nursery. Simply email friends@yolocrisisnursery.org. The Friends meet via Zoom on the second Tuesday of every month at 5:30 p.m. The rewards are priceless along with the laughter and warm community you’ll encounter in the Friends’ group.

Please visit our website, www.yolocrisisnursery.org, and subscribe to our e-newsletter to learn more about our upcoming events and to learn more about the nursery.


— This article originally appeared in the Davis Enterprise on Sunday, March 28, 2021, and was written by JoEllen Welsch, president, and Heather Sleuter, executive director, of the Yolo Crisis Nursery.

JoEllen Welsch – Davis Enterprise Letter to the Editor, published February 11, 2021

I have had the great honor and privilege of serving on the Yolo Crisis Nursery Board of Directors since January 2017. During my tenure, I have been continually impressed with the generosity of the Yolo County community in which I live, and since the onset of COVID, I am in absolute awe. In the past year, the Nursery has experienced a remarkable increased response to our outreach efforts to help us meet the surge in demand for our services. Our hearts are overflowing by the response and also for the unsolicited giving from a multitude of individuals, organizations, and institutions.

On an average day — pre-COVID — the children and families that we serve were already experiencing challenges involving domestic violence, mental and physical health emergencies, substance abuse and addiction, homelessness, sudden job loss, and other adversities. As you can imagine, every issue weighing on our client children and families has been exacerbated by the reverberating effects of the pandemic, and the number of referrals to the Nursery for critical assistance has substantially risen. Yolo Crisis Nursery is an essential provider for children and families whose situations went from urgent to potentially catastrophic with the arrival of COVID in our community.

Following strict safety mandates, the doors to the Nursery have remained open 24/7 to the infants and children who need us and to the families of essential workers with nowhere else to turn. COVID has taxed the Nursery’s staffing and resources like never before, but as our executive director, Heather Sleuter, frequently reminds me, “we figure it out” because we never say no and we never turn anyone away.

I am deeply proud of my compassionate community, and on behalf of our entire organization — our staff, volunteers, and Board of Directors—and from the children and families that we serve, thank you from the bottom of our hearts.

JoEllen Welsch
President, Yolo Crisis Nursery Board of Directors

It has been over 10 months since the first COVID-19 case was diagnosed in Yolo County. In that time, much has been asked of all of us, from flexibility, bravery and resilience to fortitude, patience and austerity. At Yolo Crisis Nursery, we have also seen firsthand the even greater impact this time of uncertainty, grief and upheaval has had on our community’s most vulnerable young children and families.

Yet, today, even as we are called on to address worrying increases in domestic violence, homelessness, and mental health emergencies, it is not difficult to conjure a deep sense of gratitude, which comes from knowing that we at the Nursery are not meeting these challenges alone.

Recently, a former Yolo Crisis Nursery parent took the time to share this note: “We need caring and compassionate people more than anything, especially now. You are front line workers not just in this pandemic, but always, for every crisis. As a family who benefited directly from your compassionate work, and also just as fellow caring humans, we are forever grateful for and inspired by the strength, dedication, kindness, proficiency and understanding with which you provide crucial services to our community.”

I couldn’t agree more. Today, I am grateful for our staff at the nursery who have never wavered in their commitment to our mission. The work of protecting children from abuse and neglect requires building and maintaining supportive, trusting and empowering relationships with families. Every day our staff continues tirelessly to innovate and adapt to changing safety protocols, never losing sight of the importance of staying connected with the people we serve.

I am grateful for our Board of Directors and volunteers who have rallied in so many ways to guide and support the nursery through this unprecedented time. Their steadfast contributions of time, talent, and resources make it possible for us to respond nimbly to the evolving needs of vulnerable children and families.

I am grateful for our fellow nonprofits and service providers working diligently to collaborate in the best interest of children and families during a time of greatly increased need and decreased resources.

Many of the families we serve are essential workers facing health and safety hazards they never anticipated, while coping with serious hardships and childcare challenges as they struggle to make ends meet each month. I am grateful the Nursery can be a resource for families who contribute so much to our community.

Whether it is the gift of a warm coat, a care package of formula and diapers, or a safe stay for a child while a parent addresses hardship — we see and hear the gratitude and relief when a family in crisis understands that they are not alone.

In addition to gratitude, I look ahead to 2021 with a sense of hope. Just today, I learned that a single father, Frank, who came to us months ago on the brink of homelessness, has secured a job promotion and stable housing where he can safely raise his young son with autism. With the support of the Nursery and our collaborators, Frank can now see the light at the end of the tunnel. Stories like Frank’s and so many others help me see that light too.

As this challenging year comes to a close, and we look to 2021 with hope for health, happiness, and a return to some version of normal, I invite you to join us with an end of year gift to the Yolo Crisis Nursery to ensure that families, like Frank’s, see and feel the hope of the new year. To donate or learn more about the Yolo Crisis Nursery, please visit our website www.yolocrisisnursery.org.

— This article written by Heather Sleuter, executive director of the Yolo Crisis Nursery, originally appeared in the Davis Enterprise on December 27, 2020

November begins the holiday season — normally, a treasured time with family and friends. This year will undoubtedly look very different for us all. Even in years without the added stress of a pandemic, for many, the holidays are not always idyllic.

Increased loneliness, anxiety, sadness, and depression are common over the holidays. This year, it’s fair to say that most of us are looking for ways to overcome some degree of melancholy. Psychology research shows that giving and gratitude can help to lift spirits and are closely linked to increased happiness.

Giving Tuesday is an annual global day of generosity, perhaps, this year, ideally timed to help us feel empowered and impactful during a moment of uncertainty, fear, and loss.

Supporting the Yolo Crisis Nursery this Giving Tuesday, Dec. 1, will give hope to the most vulnerable children in Yolo County. Every family we serve is unique, with specific needs, but each is facing crisis and adversity and often has nowhere else to turn. Your donation can provide an overnight safe stay for a child, childcare essentials and caring support at the moment a family needs it the most. And this year, three amazing donors will double the impact of your gift, by matching dollar-for-dollar all donations up to $20,000!

Your gift to the Nursery will help families like Amanda’s break the cycle of crisis and become stronger together. Amanda, a mother of two, recently moved back to Yolo County after living out of state. Unable to find housing, she and her children moved into her mother’s home where they were exposed to domestic violence. Amanda shared that her mom had a long history of choosing “bad men” and that she herself had been exposed to domestic violence through much of her childhood.

When she met with a Yolo Crisis Nursery caseworker, Amanda was homeless, without a stable income, overwhelmed with her parental responsibilities, and trying to come to terms with the haunting domestic violence experiences of her own childhood. Amanda did not want her children to have the same exposure to violence that she experienced growing up. She reached out in hopes that the Nursery could provide the stability needed for her children to escape the violence in her mother’s home. Amanda was right, the Nursery not only provided respite care for the children, but also the opportunity for her to begin to heal and start anew.

Amanda is remarkably resilient, and she needed to rely on that strength as she began the hard work of starting over again. She engaged with the Nursery’s wrap-around services to participate in parenting classes, address legal issues, find housing, obtain professional training, and engage in counseling.

In less than a year, Amanda has made remarkable accomplishments. She is in stable permanent housing with her two children. Her oldest child is enrolled in school and distance learning at a before- and aftercare program, and her youngest child is now in care at the Yolo Crisis Nursery while Amanda works towards completing nursing school and achieving her goal of becoming a nurse.

Amanda’s commitment, in the face of adversity, to keep her children safe, healthy, and strong is remarkable. Her hard work and resilience will continue to help Amanda achieve her goal of breaking the cycle of violence in her family. All of us at the Nursery are so excited to witness this strong mother attain her goals and build a brighter future for her children.

Having been with the Yolo Crisis Nursery for almost 20 years now, I continue to be amazed at the gratitude of our client families and the generosity of our supporters. Day in and day out, our staff and client families are addressing unimaginable challenges. All too often, the Nursery’s wrap-around approach and services can mean the difference between life and death for the youngest and most vulnerable children in our community

I invite you to start your season of gratitude by giving to a family facing extraordinary challenges. Through your support, the Nursery can avert disaster with well-timed assistance and early intervention. Please join us by making your gift on Giving Tuesday, Dec. 1, to enact positive change in our community and in the lives of vulnerable children in Yolo County. To learn more about the Yolo Crisis Nursery or to make a donation, please visit www.yolocrisisnursery.org.


This article was written by Becky Heard and originally appeared in the Davis Enterprise on Sunday, November 22, 2020.

The Yolo Crisis Nursery began serving children ages birth to five years old and their families in 2001. Since then, the Nursery has continuously provided early intervention services in a safe environment to nurture healthy and resilient children, strengthen parents and preserve families.

From 2001 until early 2014, the nursery operated under a parent nonprofit agency. Yolo Crisis Nursery executive director Heather Sleuter recalls receiving the news that the nursery would close in 30 days and our parent agency would leave Yolo County. “We had just bundled up the last of 12 children to leave for the day with parents and guardians. Two children would spend the night with our staff as their parents got immediate help. I thought, what will happen to these children — and all the children who need the nursery’s care — if we close?”

The departure of our host agency from Yolo County in 2014 created a crisis. The nursery was facing closure. A group of volunteers who had been formed years earlier for fundraising assistance to the Nursery — The Friends of the Yolo Crisis Nursery — immediately began to search for a licensed host agency to take over the Yolo Crisis Nursery operations. For a variety of reasons, one was not found.

With the 30 days’ notice of closure, the majority of grants that had funded the nursery were terminated. There was no more agency, no more money and no more time. The clock was ticking. And then, the angels arrived and brought with them the miracles that are now legendary.

Heidy Kellison, president of the Friends, boldly negotiated a continuation of the Yolo Crisis Nursery operations with private funding while a nonprofit corporation was formed, licensed and became a public 501(c)(3) charity. The Yolo Crisis Nursery now had 90 days to remain open while securing funding for the interim operation of the nursery and a full fiscal year of funding for operations totaling almost $400,000. Heidy returned to Friends of the Yolo Crisis Nursery with a three-month clock, determination and enduring hope.  She is my hero.

Yolo Crisis Nursery Inc., was formed with a board of directors consisting of Becky Heard, as chair, Kellison, Liz Malinoff, Trish Bosco and myself. On behalf of the new corporation, I submitted an application for 501 (c) (3) status, and Heather Sleuter, completed all of the licensing applications. Yolo County Children’s Alliance acted as the interim public charity on behalf of the new corporation.

With the 90 days quickly racing by, the newly formed board immediately hired Cam Stoufer to help replace the terminated grants with new funding streams. Cam’s efforts yielded immediate dividends and continued throughout her six years of service. While Cam applied for grant funding, the newly formed Board and the Friends of the Yolo Crisis Nursery were feverishly fundraising to save the nursery.

The Yolo Crisis Nursery is open today because of the generosity of Yolo County citizens, businesses and organizations, as well as our families and friends nationwide. All are connected by our shared belief that every child deserves to grow up in a safe, loving, and stable home. The redemption story of these times is for a different forum than this article, but the angles ranged from bakes sales to large monetary donations.

In those 90 days, contributions from family and friends, and the Yolo community of individuals, clubs, churches, and others, as well as grants, totaled $364,000! At the risk of forgetting someone, I will not attempt to enumerate the many contributors of time, talent and treasure. But, for the sake of deservedness, I must give credit to Yolo County Supervisor Jim Provenza for his advocacy during this perilous time.  His commitment and passion for the mission and community need of the Yolo Crisis Nursery became the cornerstone of our successful fundraising efforts.

In 2015, the newly licensed, nonprofit corporation Yolo Crisis Nursery Inc. began standalone activity. Sleuter was named executive director and has continued in that capacity to this day. In our first full year as an independent nonprofit, we served 129 children. Last year, we served 692 children. We serve at-risk children ages birth to 5 years old and their families as an upstream investment in the future of our community.

The COVID-19 pandemic has brought new challenges to the nursery. The Yolo Crisis Nursery is an essential service and has remained open during the stay-at-home orders. “Over six months into the pandemic, we have more families than ever in crisis. We are seeing increases in clients experiencing domestic violence, homelessness, and postpartum depression,” Sleuter said. “In addition, we are helping essential workers with young children and distributing record numbers of care packages in our community. The need has never been greater.”

As it has since 2001, the Nursery has remained open, serving a population under great stress. These families are hit hardest by the pandemic and are struggling with homelessness, unemployment, isolation, and uncertainty. I invite you to support the Nursery and the children they serve with your time, talents, or a donation. To learn more please visit www.yolocrisisnursery.org. We are community.

This article was written by Vic Bucher and originally appeared in the Davis Enterprise on Sunday, October 25, 2020.

Six months into the COVID-19 pandemic, we are all adapting to what our new “normal” life looks like. I am seeing this in my own life and in the experiences of my patients. For new parents, this is amplified in ways that many of us cannot fathom.

Just imagine bringing your first child into the world as a single mother. To keep your newborn baby safe, you are not able to share your bundle of joy with family and friends for fear of exposure to COVID. Beyond the emotional isolation, fulfilling basic needs, like going to the grocery store, is a challenge for fear of exposing both yourself and your infant to the virus.

Amber, a young mother of two, found herself isolated, alone and without any support. Amber and Josh welcomed their second child this summer and in August, Josh was deployed with the National Guard. This was not the first time Josh had been deployed, but it was the most challenging for Amber. The added stress of COVID-19 had her feeling isolated and more alone than ever. Separated from Josh, her family and friends, Amber was stripped of her usual support system and was unable to overcome the biological and emotional symptoms of postpartum depression.

Thankfully, Amber found the Yolo Crisis Nursery. Amber came to us exhausted, with despair visible on her face, not having slept in over a week. With her family thousands of miles away and friends unable to help due to the pandemic, Amber and her two children were all alone. The nursery welcomed Amber, her newborn daughter, and 4-year-old son with wraparound arms.

Our trauma-trained staff lovingly cared for the children while one of our caseworkers met with Amber to get her help and establish a treatment plan for her postpartum depression. Through our initial screening process, Amber’s 4-year-old son was identified as being on the autism spectrum. After his diagnosis, one of our caseworkers connected Amber to necessary services including Alta California Regional Center and an Individualized Education Plan. Meanwhile, the nursery cared for both children in our daycare and preschool while Amber received the necessary medical and counseling services to help her battle postpartum depression.

The Yolo Crisis Nursery is an essential resource for our community and a place of hope for families in crisis. I am proud to serve on the Yolo Crisis Nursery Board of Directors. As one of only four crisis nurseries in California, the Yolo Crisis Nursery is an essential early intervention child-abuse-prevention program. We serve families with children ages birth to 5 years and offer trauma-informed childcare, including crisis and respite care. Equally important are our wraparound services to assist families to resolve the crises that brought them to our door. Our services are voluntary and provided free of charge to our client families.

Unfortunately, history informs us that as stress increases — like during a pandemic — all too often, neglect and abuse also increase. Now more than ever, it is important that we recognize and guide those in our community, like Amber, who may need extra assistance to get the help they need.

Amber is not alone. Last year, 13% of new mothers reported experiencing postpartum depression in California. At the nursery and in my work as a physician, we have seen an increase in postpartum depression cases since COVID-19 caused the shelter-in-place order in March. This trend will likely continue because so many families are experiencing extreme stress, a risk factor for postpartum depression. Sadly, the populations most susceptible to postpartum depression are some of the hardest hit by the pandemic — racial and ethnic minorities, Medicaid-eligible low-income families, and those with lower levels of educational attainment. Those populations all report more cases of postpartum depression symptoms compared to non-Hispanic white women.

If you believe that all children deserve to grow up in a safe, loving, and stable home and would like to help young families like Amber’s, I invite you to join us at the Yolo Crisis Nursery. We are always looking for people who are willing to lend their time and talent to join us.  To learn more or to make a gift, please visit our website at www.yolocrisisnursery.org. We would love the opportunity to get to know you.

— By Joan Smith-Maclean, Yolo Crisis Nursery Board Member. This article originally appeared in the Davis Enterprise on Sunday, September 27, 2020

So much has changed and yet some things remain the same.

As a member of the Yolo Crisis Nursery Board of Directors, an 18-year member and past president of the Davis Rotary Club, and a passionate advocate for children, I am seeing the potentially devastating challenges the COVID-19 pandemic is creating for young children and their families.  COVID has changed the way the Yolo Crisis nursery works, but it has not changed the positive impact the nursery makes on children’s lives.

With so many in our community struggling, the services that charitable organizations — like the Yolo Crisis Nursery — provide are as critically necessary as ever, as demonstrated in Amanda’s story below.

Amanda is an essential worker and a single mother battling mental illness.  Amanda and her 4-year-old daughter, Isabella, came to the nursery in April when they found themselves in an impossible situation. Amanda needed to go to work and childcare was scarce due to the shelter-in-place orders.

Without childcare, Amanda’s mental health was stretched to the limit, she risked losing her job, her home, and most importantly, Isabella.  The nursery quickly assessed their needs and wrapped them both with compassionate care and services. Unbeknownst to Amanda until assessed by the trauma-trained Yolo Crisis Nursery staff through its intake and screening process, Isabella was identified to be deaf and on the autism spectrum.

Our amazing nursery staff worked with Amanda to help her understand Isabella’s diagnosis and connected her to the medical and social services her family needed. Together with Amanda and Isabella’s doctors, we built a treatment plan.

Isabella thrived at the nursery, as our staff worked with her on non-verbal communication skills and some behavior modifications.  Isabella made huge improvements in her social functioning and communication skills while in the nursery’s care.

With the nursery’s help, in just three months, Isabella has a medical plan in place and is enrolled in a preschool with an individual education plan.  Amanda is healthy, employed, stable, and is the best mom she can be for Isabella. The pandemic has changed our world, but thankfully, some things have not changed.

The Yolo Crisis Nursery is here to help all families in crisis with children from birth to five years old, and our services are voluntary and provided free of charge. Asking for help is sometimes not easy for parents; it takes courage and love for your child. We understand that parents are doing their very best, but sometimes they need assistance to properly care for their children.

The Nursery is funded by the generosity of individuals, businesses, foundations, granting agencies, and local government.  We could not help people like Amanda and Isabella without this ongoing support.  Regrettably, we will not be able to gather in person for our annual Barn Dance fundraiser this fall.

While we may not be able to line dance, we can get in line to support Yolo County kids in crisis through the Travis Credit Union Foundation’s COVID-19 Relief Initiative. Every dollar donated up to $20,000 by September 30th will unlock a dollar-for-dollar matching gift for the Yolo Crisis Nursery from the Travis Credit Union Foundation.

This is a tremendous opportunity to double your donation and to help more children and families in crisis.  To qualify for the matching gift, all donations must go through the Travis Credit Union Foundation.

Please visit www.tcufund.org/ways-to-give/ and select Yolo Crisis Nursery from the dropdown box to donate online or to learn more about how to donate in person or via check. Alternatively, you may also visit a local Travis Credit Union branch and specify that your foundation gift is to benefit the Yolo Crisis Nursery.

As the only crisis nursery in Yolo County, Yolo Crisis Nursery has always been an essential resource and place of hope for families, and it has been especially so for those dramatically impacted by COVID-19. I am extremely proud of the amazing work that our Executive Director, Heather Sleuter, and her team do day in and day out for children and families in Yolo County, no matter the circumstances.

It is my pleasure and honor to serve on the Yolo Crisis Nursery Board of Directors. The work we are doing as a board to advance our vision that every child grows up in a safe, loving, and stable home is rewarding in ways I could not have imagined.

If you believe that all children deserve to grow up in a safe, loving and stable home and would like to help young families like Amanda and Isabella, I invite you to join us at the Yolo Crisis Nursery.

We are always looking for people who are willing to lend their time and talent to join us.  To learn more or to make a gift, please visit our website www.yolocrisisnursery.org. If you think you might be interested in joining the Yolo Crisis Nursery Board of Directors, please email us at info@yolocrisisnursery.org. We would love the opportunity to get to know you.

— Kay Resler is a member of the board of directors for the Yolo Crisis Nursery. This article originally appeared in the Davis Enterprise on July 26, 2020. 

Life has been turned upside-down for us all since mid-March. We are so thankful we had our eighth annual Krustaceans for Kids Crab Feed before then. The evening was the last social gathering for so many of us before sheltering in place to help flatten the curve.

As the State begins to reopen, we want to express our deep gratitude for two record-breaking events — Big Day of Giving and Krustaceans for Kids. The proceeds raised through these events are allowing the Nursery staff to serve more families in new and creative ways from the frontlines of the Coronavirus pandemic.

We are so grateful for all who sprinkled the Nursery with Love for the Big Day of Giving during the first week in May. Despite the challenging circumstances in all of our lives, our amazing community rallied to help the most vulnerable children and those hardest hit by the pandemic.

We extend a special thanks to Greg and Amy McNece and the Yolo Crisis Nursery Board of Directors for their matching gifts. We are so pleased to have exceeded those generous gifts. Thank you also to all who donated and participated in our Sprinkler Challenge — Yolo County kids felt all that love! The gifts made for Big Day of Giving have a profoundly positive impact at this critical juncture. Thank You!

This year’s Krustaceans for Kids Crab Feed was made possible by our generous sponsors, donors, volunteers, and guests, to whom this year we say a very special thank you! We cannot thank our volunteers enough, particularly the event co-chairs Nancy Storm and Martha Bernauer. The year-after-year growth of this sell-out event would not be possible without their leadership and tireless efforts. To the entire Friends of the Yolo Crisis Nursery team: You are making the world a better place for the children of Yolo County and you have our heartfelt appreciation.

Thank you also Lamppost Pizza, Upper Crust Bakery, Sudwerk Brewing, and Paradise Valley Estates for your delicious donations. And a very special thank you goes to our volunteer servers from the National Charity League and Woodland High School National Honors students.

We would like to recognize and thank our returning Premier Sponsor Sutter Health and King Crab Sponsors Jim and Lucinda Childress, Davisville Management Company, 2nd Street Storage, Aggie Square Apartments, Fountain Circle Townhomes and Almondwood Apartments for their ongoing generosity and support.

Sincere thanks to our generous Dungeness Crab Sponsors: Dignity Health, Kaiser Permanente, and Harris and Mary Liu of the Woodland McDonald’s.

To our wonderful Blue Crab Sponsors: Martha Bernauer & Maren Heise, Brooks Painting & Higgins Team Good Home Group, Brown Construction Inc., Marguerite Callahan, Carbahal & Company, Coldwell Banker Select Davis & Woodland, Davis Firefighters Local 3494, Davis Oddfellows & Davis Rebekah Lodge, F Street Dispensary, Steve & Teri Greenfield, Heidy & Peter Kellison, Morse Custom Homes & Remodeling, NakanoKennedySimpson, Recology, Kay Resler, Shottenkirk Honda, Sharon Schauer & Brodie Hamilton, Stromberg Redway Friends, Swim America – Davis, Stewart & Ann Teal, Union Bank, and Welsch Family & Friends – Thank you.

On behalf of the Board of Directors and Friends of the Yolo Crisis Nursery, we would also like to thank our amazing volunteer kitchen crew, bartenders, security team, The Bridge Church, Collegiate Studios, and CK Hicks.

And last but not least, thank you to the numerous businesses, community groups and individuals who donated items for our auction and raffle. Your generosity was a critical piece to our success.

Our local small businesses have always rallied to support those in need in our community, and we encourage our community to shop local to support those businesses in their time of need. If you are interested in helping vulnerable children and families in Yolo County, I hope you’ll consider joining us. Please email bheard@yolocrisisnursery.org to learn more about how you can help the Yolo Crisis Nursery. Visit our website, www.yolocrisisnursery.org, to learn more or join us with a donation or by volunteering.

— This article was written by Steve Willhoff, Yolo Crisis Nursery Treasurer. The article first appeared in the Davis Enterprise on May 24, 2020. 

Safety, compassion, community, commitment, respect, and hope are the values that Yolo Crisis Nursery embraces 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year.

Every child we serve receives 100% of our dedication to maintaining those values, along with our further commitment to embrace their parents in our wrap-around services to help preserve their family so that they can grow up in a safe, loving, and stable home.

When parents and caregivers experience high levels of stress without resources, support or relief to help manage their crises, child abuse, and neglect increases. In this unprecedented period of uncertainty due to COVID-19, there are more families than ever experiencing extreme stress.

When parents aren’t able to work, poverty and homelessness will increase, leading to prolonged toxic stress on families that will result in increased domestic violence, substance abuse, child abuse, psychiatric issues, and other serious situations. In these uncertain times, the Yolo Crisis Nursery will focus on the safety of our community’s most vulnerable children as well as the safety of our staff.

We will keep providing services to help children whose safety is at the highest risk within the guidelines of national and local health officials. We are monitoring the CDC guidelines and are in contact with state, local and county health officials regularly to ensure our staff, children, and their families are kept as safe as possible.

Yolo County’s recent shelter-at-home mandate will help reduce the risk of further spread of the virus and save lives. We understand that COVID-19 is causing concern and upheaval for us as individuals and for our community. We are feeling this and our community’s children feel it too. Children may be agitated or confused as they are undoubtedly unsettled by the drastic changes to their normal routines and unavoidable ominous news that surrounds us all.

Now more than ever, it is important that we recognize and guide those in our community who might need extra assistance to the help they need. Yolo County is filled with generous and compassionate people and together we all do make a difference. Together we can weather this crisis with grace, dignity, and minimize the suffering for our community.

During this time, the Yolo Crisis Nursery is developing online resources, and information to help families stay strong and resilient. If you have not already liked the Friends of the Yolo Crisis Nursery page on Facebook, please join our community for the latest updates.

We are working to bring in child and family specialists as well as other experts. We plan to cover key topics like how to discuss the virus with children, parental self-care, as well as ideas to keep children engaged and learning during this challenging time. Please like us on Facebook and stay tuned!

We invite you to join us, please visit www.yolocrisisnursery.org to learn more about the nursery, or to make a donation. Thank you Yolo County, we are stronger together.

— This was written by Heather Sleuter is the executive director of the Yolo Crisis Nursery and first appeared in Davis Enterprise on March 22, 2020.